12 Comments

  1. My wife is a teacher, and ran the grade school library for a couple of years, so we have plenty of opportunities to contribute in-kind goods to help meet needs for the school and it’s students. It is truly a joy to see repurposed items used by students and their families with the same joy we felt when we originally got the items.

    One of the more under served organizations in our area is the local Humane Society. This time of year folks naturally tend to focus on charities that serve people and that leaves animals out in the cold (figuratively, and unfortunately sometimes literally). Our local shelter is a “no-kill” facility and can always use food, cleaning supplies and helping hands (in addition to money). I’m sure many other similarly situated shelters find donations hard to come by during the holidays and I would encourage folks to remember our furry little friends as well during this season of giving.

    • Yes! We always give to our animal shelters, and we try to be especially generous this time of year. It’s so sad to hear how many animals end up at shelters right after the holidays.

  2. I am so bad at charitable giving. I can totally afford to do it, but I look at the money and think that I would rather see it growing my net worth than going to charity. (So greedy!) Your regular posts about charitable giving are definitely pushing me to be more generous!

    • You made my day with this comment! I completely understand your thoughts. It’s instinctual, right? Take care of yourself first. For me, though, I felt like I finally “arrived” financially when I really could afford to start worrying more about helping others than myself!

  3. I agree with both Oldster, about supporting local animal charities, and with Solitary Diner, that we can definitely do more. Although we do focus on giving money more than time, it’s still not enough.

    There’s a local kids’ charity we’ve been giving to “in kind” every year. They hold a bicycle drive for children with families who don’t have the means to purchase them. We buy two new bikes (a boy’s and a girl’s) at Walmart and bring them over to the designated drop off place. It’s a lot of fun. And this charity is totally dependent on donations — no government grants and very little goes towards overhead. I urge people to check on that either through Charity Navigator or my favorite — Guidestar.

    The other program I love is Samaritan’s Purse — Operation Christmas Child. Talk about a little effort going a long way. We’ve not been consistent every year but we’ve participated a few times.

    • This is all awesome, Mrs. G! I will definitely click around the interwebs. I wonder if we have a similar program or could do something with bicycles in my area!

  4. Right now, I focus my giving on donating my professional skills to a nonprofit that needs them. My financial contributions are much smaller than I’d like, but I will be raising them as soon as it is safe to.

  5. I make it a point to give even if it hurts because we are incredibly fortunate. Even if it feels like every dollar is only worth a quarter here, and everything costs thousands, we still have dollars. I batch prioritize: cash and in-kind donations to animal shelters and rescue organizations, organizations that feed the needy, rehome clothes so they get an additional life, literacy programs, and disaster relief efforts. We should donate in smaller amounts through the year so they’re not just getting once a year donations but I’m not quite organized enough for that yet. We may go to a quarterly system in 2018 – it’s worth a try!

    • I love the idea of a quarterly system. And your right about realizing what we do already have. I was asking my husband if he cared if I bought another gift card for a gift card drive to help families at my school. He looked and me and said, “If you’re buying presents for people this year, of course we should help out.”

      He’s so smart. 😉

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