Doubting Your Charitable Giving

charitable giving enough doubtsLast month, our school participated in a coin competition. While I’m not entirely keen on asking students for money, especially right after all the annual back-to-school fundraisers that also ask kids to sell things to the community for money, I rolled with it. The money was going towards a good cause, and many of my kids were enthusiastic about it. So I promoted it. We counted–and recounted and recounted again–the change and graphed our progress each day. They were pretty pleased. Until it was announced that a student from another class brought in $100. Then, the coins stopped appearing.

At first, I didn’t understand it. Wouldn’t that inspire you to give more? I made more persuasive announcements. I donated money. I had kids make announcements. Still, the box sat mostly empty. About that same time, I read about Mr. Money Mustache and Physician on Fire giving away $100,000. Then, Leigh set up a donor-advised fund. And suddenly, that empty box made too much sense. Continue reading “Doubting Your Charitable Giving”

Doubting Your Charitable Giving

Montana Money Advenures: Best Money Spent

montanaMs. Montana from Montana Money Adventures is on the blog today sharing her take on the best money spent series. Last week, a good money test was spending in ways that gets you more bang for your buck. This week, Ms. Montana has a new way to determine your best money spent: the 2x test. Continue reading “Montana Money Advenures: Best Money Spent”

Montana Money Advenures: Best Money Spent

Our Current Giving Practices and Goals

Current (2)Earlier in the week, I penned a call to giving. Of course, volunteering time and talent makes a difference. I’d like to think that Mr. P and I both know that well from firsthand experience. But charitable giving matters just as much–maybe, in some ways, even more. As a result, Mr. P and I work to prioritize charitable giving as we pursue financial independence. To keep the act of giving at the forefront of our minds, we include it in our monthly budget, but we also make sure to include weekly giving when we grocery shop.  Continue reading “Our Current Giving Practices and Goals”

Our Current Giving Practices and Goals

You Don’t Have to Give, But You Absolutely Should

A Call to (1)The oxygen mask on an airplane analogy is a cornerstone in life lessons. It essentially boils down to the notion that we need to help ourselves before we can effectively help anyone else. I get it. What I don’t understand, though, is the fact that so many people feel that they not only have to have their masks positioned just so, but they must also upgrade to an elite model and make sure that they can use their own masks in perpetuity before even deigning to glance at struggling passengers. Some of whom are seated in the very same row.

My fear is that far too often we allow the notion of personal finance to become insular. Yes, personal finance is about arranging your own finances in such a way that your money is ultimately able to work for you. Not the other way around. But to what end?  Continue reading “You Don’t Have to Give, But You Absolutely Should”

You Don’t Have to Give, But You Absolutely Should

To Families Who Gave Teachers Gifts

Teacher Gifts (1) To The Families Who Gave Teachers Gifts,

I spent the day before winter break writing your children thank you notes that I am fairly confident you will never see. In fact, they’ve probably already been relinquished to the deep recesses of binders next to permission slips, school calendars, and progress reports or banished to the bottoms of lockers atop moldy sandwiches, gym shirts, and library books. Some cards won’t even make it that far. Some are tossed in the trash, which I later dutifully recycle. Others are discarded underneath desks. Even if you did see my note, the letter I wrote your child is different than what I’d like to say to you.  Continue reading “To Families Who Gave Teachers Gifts”

To Families Who Gave Teachers Gifts